Domestication explores nostalgia and psychological solitude found in domestic social space. Although a person may be part of a group, they often find themselves in isolation. Such dislocation is commonplace in a fully mobile world, and requires that one be defined not by their immediate surroundings (which may change at any given moment), but by previous experience. Ornamentation becomes a necessary protection for both our distinction from others and our identification within a community. Pattern and color investigate how emblematic devices perpetuate collective cultural myths, influence behavior, and use memory to define an individual. Humans and animals are allegorically arranged in familiar social orders, confirming our ability to perceive and respond to the delicate features of institutional control and power relationships. Domestic behavior is explored through flowery references to the archetypal household, agoraphobia, and bridled animal aggression. A comforting yet stifling familiarity emerges among allegorical arrangements of animals, recalling—with reluctance—our human vulnerabilities. Within the domestic sphere, ornate rooms and lush patterning mock our repressed aggression as animals battle in the foreground. These bestial struggles suggest that we examine reality of our own domestication by evaluating what we control and the powers we submit to. Although this work is influenced by personal experience within different cultures, these images are also informed by reading in the fields of gender studies, cognitive science, and visual culture.

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